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The Latest

Sep 22, 2014 / 12,549 notes

(Most of) Awesome Mix, Vol. 1

(via modernathena90)

Sep 21, 2014 / 112,187 notes

permguerrero:

memes are people too 

(via modernathena90)

robsoanxious:

#capital #building #sanfrancisco #city #hall #downtown #sfca #dayoff (at San Francisco City Hall - County Clerk)
Sep 21, 2014 / 26 notes

robsoanxious:

#capital #building #sanfrancisco #city #hall #downtown #sfca #dayoff (at San Francisco City Hall - County Clerk)

(via sfcitylights)

Sep 21, 2014 / 38 notes
Sep 16, 2014 / 80,323 notes

This is our lives lol

(via wiigz)

jano-ptv-bro:

San Francisco is so pretty 😍
Sep 16, 2014 / 17 notes

jano-ptv-bro:

San Francisco is so pretty 😍

(via sfcitylights)

drroykim:

The sustainable, compost friendly garden in AT&T baseball park. Yes, the compost comes from the remnants of each game. Yes, you see living towers filled with herbs, Yes, the herbs and veggies are used in the food at the park. Only in San Francisco. #sfgiants #attpark #baseball #mlb #garden #sustainable #ecological #ecofriendly #onlyinsanfrancisco #sanfrancisco (at At&T Park, Centerfield Bleachers)
Sep 16, 2014 / 20 notes

drroykim:

The sustainable, compost friendly garden in AT&T baseball park. Yes, the compost comes from the remnants of each game. Yes, you see living towers filled with herbs, Yes, the herbs and veggies are used in the food at the park. Only in San Francisco. #sfgiants #attpark #baseball #mlb #garden #sustainable #ecological #ecofriendly #onlyinsanfrancisco #sanfrancisco (at At&T Park, Centerfield Bleachers)

(via sfcitylights)

featheroftheowl:

Eastern Screech Owl by tncmrktg
Sep 15, 2014 / 489 notes

featheroftheowl:

Eastern Screech Owl by tncmrktg

cubebreaker:

Lombard Street | Source | Cube Breaker | Follow
Sep 14, 2014 / 172 notes

cubebreaker:

Lombard Street | Source | Cube Breaker | Follow

(via sfcitylights)

Sep 14, 2014 / 61,876 notes
Sep 14, 2014 / 269,809 notes

lcieheroine:

image

I will do my best to carry you when you need a lift

image

Comfort you when you’re sad

image

We all feel down now and then

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But I’m here if you need me

(via modernathena90)

the-knight-0f-breath:

mastertigress:

fuffuster:

sabrielhasablog:

ultrafacts:

Source  More Facts HERE

no
i’m actually crying
NO.
baby it’s okay you did good

NO


//.. .. .Ow.

Ow my heart
Sep 11, 2014 / 126,127 notes

the-knight-0f-breath:

mastertigress:

fuffuster:

sabrielhasablog:

ultrafacts:

Source  More Facts HERE

no

i’m actually crying

NO.

baby it’s okay you did good

NO

//.. .. .Ow.

Ow my heart

(via modernathena90)

Sep 11, 2014 / 147,936 notes
mindblowingscience:

OUCHLESS PATCHES DELIVER PAINKILLER FASTER

A new microneedle patch, filled with dozens of tiny polymeric needles just 0.6 millimeters long, could provide pain-free injections.
In laboratory experiments, researchers showed that the microneedle patch could deliver lidocaine, a common painkiller, within five minutes of application.
In contrast, the drug in a commercial transdermal patch took 45 minutes to penetrate into the skin.
The shorter time for drug delivery is possible due to the miniature needles on the patch that create micrometer-sized porous channels in the skin when applied. The size of the patch could easily be adjusted to encapsulate different drug dosages.
Researchers, led by Kang Lifeng of National University of Singapore’s pharmacy department, report the pain-free and noninvasive technique in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.
This new way to administer painkillers quickly is good news for people who squirm at the sight of needles.
Team member Jaspreet Singh Kochhar says the research team tested the patch on themselves to confirm that the microneedles do not cause pain when applied to the skin. They only experienced a minor skin reddening as from being pinched.
The scientists also conducted a study that shows the microneedle patch delivers collagen to the dermis layer of the skin, unlike current skincare products that remain on the outermost skin layer. That work appeared in Pharmaceutical Research earlier this year.
Given the innovative technique for administering drug noninvasively, the patch can also be used in home-care settings. Patients could self-manage their pain arising from chronic diseases such as diabetes and cancer.
Moving forward, the researchers will test if the patch is useful for vaccinating young children, and for treating hair loss. For example, the patch can be applied to a baby’s arm five minutes before vaccination, so that the painkiller minimizes the pain from the subsequent jab.
The investigators have filed a patent for their technique through the NUS Industry Liaison Office. Kang Lifeng led the study.
Sep 11, 2014 / 190 notes

mindblowingscience:

OUCHLESS PATCHES DELIVER PAINKILLER FASTER

A new microneedle patch, filled with dozens of tiny polymeric needles just 0.6 millimeters long, could provide pain-free injections.

In laboratory experiments, researchers showed that the microneedle patch could deliver lidocaine, a common painkiller, within five minutes of application.

In contrast, the drug in a commercial transdermal patch took 45 minutes to penetrate into the skin.

The shorter time for drug delivery is possible due to the miniature needles on the patch that create micrometer-sized porous channels in the skin when applied. The size of the patch could easily be adjusted to encapsulate different drug dosages.

Researchers, led by Kang Lifeng of National University of Singapore’s pharmacy department, report the pain-free and noninvasive technique in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

This new way to administer painkillers quickly is good news for people who squirm at the sight of needles.

Team member Jaspreet Singh Kochhar says the research team tested the patch on themselves to confirm that the microneedles do not cause pain when applied to the skin. They only experienced a minor skin reddening as from being pinched.

The scientists also conducted a study that shows the microneedle patch delivers collagen to the dermis layer of the skin, unlike current skincare products that remain on the outermost skin layer. That work appeared in Pharmaceutical Research earlier this year.

Given the innovative technique for administering drug noninvasively, the patch can also be used in home-care settings. Patients could self-manage their pain arising from chronic diseases such as diabetes and cancer.

Moving forward, the researchers will test if the patch is useful for vaccinating young children, and for treating hair loss. For example, the patch can be applied to a baby’s arm five minutes before vaccination, so that the painkiller minimizes the pain from the subsequent jab.

The investigators have filed a patent for their technique through the NUS Industry Liaison Office. Kang Lifeng led the study.

(via nursingisinmyblood)

Sep 10, 2014 / 310 notes

newberynyc:

Columbia University 7.2014

Photography by: Newbery Rosario || Instagram: newbery.nyc

(via attackonstudying)