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lol she was in line for 10 minutes

Oh my God
Jul 23, 2014 / 141,632 notes

lol she was in line for 10 minutes

Oh my God

(via thatfunnyblog)

Jul 20, 2014 / 246 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Hemerophila diva

Sometimes known as the “Diva Hemerophila Moth” H. diva is a colorful species of metalmark moth (Choreutidae) which occurs in Cuba and more rarely in Florida. H. diva larvae feed almost exclusively on Ficus species and will curl their leaves and skeletonize their surface. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Choreutoidea-Choreutidae-Hemerophila-H. diva

Image(s):  © Jeff Hollenbeck

Jul 18, 2014 / 23 notes

(via sfcitylights)

Jul 18, 2014 / 1,896 notes
Jul 16, 2014 / 5,165 notes
Jul 16, 2014 / 42,076 notes

sky3cifer:

highschoolhead:

huffingtonpost:

THIS DOG’S FINAL DAY PROVES WE SHOULD LIVE EVERY DAY LIKE IT’S OUR LAST

The Roberts family knew they had to put their beloved dog, Duke, to sleep after the cancer began to take over his body. So, they decided to make his final day on Earth his most special.

See more photos from Duke’s last day that will bring you to tears here.

ok im crying

I’m fucking sobbing

(via yourknifemyback23)

Jul 14, 2014 / 964 notes

Anonymous said: What starbucks drink represents what type of doctor?

wayfaringmd:

ladykaymd:

Oh gosh I love this.

Latte—Internal Medicine—The latte is the backbone of any coffee shop—fail to make a good latte and you fail everywhere! IM docs are often times the center of patient care in the adult world. The perfect mix of strong medicine with just enough mellowed milk poured in, IM docs are hard-working sweethearts ready to go to bat for their patients. 

Red Eye—Rads—Mostly because you’d need that much caffeine to stay awake in the dark all the time!! It’s also essential that radiologists always keep their eyes open to pick up on the tiny details on those CTs. 

Chai—Family medicine—Chai is a little bit of everything! A little sweet, a little spicy, a little creamy, a little tea, a little caffeine. Family med docs seem to have a hand in every pot doing a little derm, a little OB, a little psych, and a little chronic disease management all in one day! Chai seems like the perfect drink for these guys. 

Straight espresso (ideally injected right into a vein)—ER—This one seems pretty obvious to me! ER docs work crazy night shifts, and are generally the kind of adrenaline junkies that would drink their espresso just straight up. 

White chocolate mocha—OB—One part hard core caffeine, one part the sweetest white chocolate you can find, the white chocolate mocha is just like the mix of really crazy procedures they do in OB with the sweet adorable baby moments. 

Black coffee—Neurology—Neuro seems pretty simple on the outside but once you dive into the complexity of it you find a dozen layers underneath that “black box” of a brain. A good strong cup of black coffee is just like this—seemingly simple on the outside, but full of a dozen different flavors you might not have thought of the first time. 

Caramel Frappuccino—Anesthesia—Anesthesiologists are the docs coming to “chill” you out—which is probably why they always seem so “chill”. Caramel Frappuccinos also do double duty hitting dessert and coffee fix in one go—the way anesthesiologists always seem to manage to have time to do medicine and research!

Starbucks Canned Double Shot—Pathology—Mostly because I feel like it was intended to wake the dead. Haha. But more accurately pathologists are often the “neglected” medical specialty with most people feeling like they don’t usually see live patients so they’re not the same as most doctors—BUT they’re a super important part of the team and can really save your butt when you need help fast! Someone get me a read me the biopsy! QUICK! 

Cappuccinos—Surgery—A little bit finicky, the perfect cappuccino can take a lifetime to master. Surgeons, like cappuccinos demand perfection! But, they’re classic, strong, get the job done, and all with a fluffy coat of foam! Besides—pouring the perfect cappuccino with those little designs on top requires quite a precise hand!

Pumpkin Spice Latte—Psych. I mean—come on. The people who are so addicted to this coffee should see psychiatrists for some addiction counseling! 

Skinny Vanilla Latte—Dermatology—While appearing “fluffy” at first glance, dermatologists do everything from cancer to procedural work. Don’t judge this drink from the outside! 

Americano—Ortho—Just like the ortho docs muscling a bone back into place, an americano is just strong enough to wake you up in the morning. (Side note: The drink was named after American GIs who didn’t like the strong French espresso—I’ll let you draw your own conclusion about what that means about ortho docs??)

Hot chocolate—Pediatrics—Warm, comforting, sweet, and adored by children everywhere. 

Disclaimer: this post is OBVIOUSLY a joke. I intend no disrespect to any specialty by it!! It is all intended just to make you laugh and any stereotypes represented here don’t represent my view point on the specialties. 

yay! I get the only tea one!

Jul 13, 2014 / 3,156 notes

(via wiigz)

ucsdhealthsciences:

New Approach to Remove Blood Clots Catheter-based system removes clots without open heart surgery  
When a large blood clot was discovered attached to the end of a catheter inside the right atrial chamber of a patient’s heart, doctors faced a daunting challenge. If the clot came loose, the consequences would likely be catastrophic for the patient, who suffered from pulmonary hypertension – a dangerous narrowing of blood vessels connecting the heart and lungs.
But experts at the UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (SCVC) are now able to save patients like this one from potentially fatal outcomes by using a new technology capable of removing blood clots, infected masses or foreign bodies from major cardiac blood vessels without performing open-heart surgery.
The SCVC is the first in San Diego County to use the AngioVac system developed by AngioDynamics. The AngioVac is a catheter-based device in which thin tubes are inserted into two major veins in the body through the neck or groin area. Under X-ray guidance, the flexible tubes are advanced to the proximal veins, right-sided heart chambers and/or lung arteries. Each is equipped with an expandable, balloon-shaped funnel tip that, when attached to a bypass circuit, vacuums the targeted material, such as a blood, clot out of the body.
“In some cases, medications can be used to dissolve blood clots, but this treatment option does not work for all patients, especially those who are in a life-threatening situation,” said Mitul Patel, MD, FACC, interventional cardiologist at UC San Diego Health System. “This new device allows our team to safely extract material, preventing the patient from having to undergo invasive, high-risk surgery.”
Open-heart surgery takes much longer to perform and often requires the surgeon to divide the breastbone lengthwise down the middle and spread the halves apart to access the heart. After the heart is repaired, surgeons use wires to hold the breastbone and ribs in place as they heal.
"Removing a blood clot through open-heart surgery results in longer hospitalization, recovery and rehabilitation times compared to the minimally invasive approach provided by this new device," said Victor Pretorius, MBchB, cardiothoracic surgeon at UC San Diego Health System.
Read more here
Jul 13, 2014 / 303 notes

ucsdhealthsciences:

New Approach to Remove Blood Clots
Catheter-based system removes clots without open heart surgery 

When a large blood clot was discovered attached to the end of a catheter inside the right atrial chamber of a patient’s heart, doctors faced a daunting challenge. If the clot came loose, the consequences would likely be catastrophic for the patient, who suffered from pulmonary hypertension – a dangerous narrowing of blood vessels connecting the heart and lungs.

But experts at the UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (SCVC) are now able to save patients like this one from potentially fatal outcomes by using a new technology capable of removing blood clots, infected masses or foreign bodies from major cardiac blood vessels without performing open-heart surgery.

The SCVC is the first in San Diego County to use the AngioVac system developed by AngioDynamics. The AngioVac is a catheter-based device in which thin tubes are inserted into two major veins in the body through the neck or groin area. Under X-ray guidance, the flexible tubes are advanced to the proximal veins, right-sided heart chambers and/or lung arteries. Each is equipped with an expandable, balloon-shaped funnel tip that, when attached to a bypass circuit, vacuums the targeted material, such as a blood, clot out of the body.

“In some cases, medications can be used to dissolve blood clots, but this treatment option does not work for all patients, especially those who are in a life-threatening situation,” said Mitul Patel, MD, FACC, interventional cardiologist at UC San Diego Health System. “This new device allows our team to safely extract material, preventing the patient from having to undergo invasive, high-risk surgery.”

Open-heart surgery takes much longer to perform and often requires the surgeon to divide the breastbone lengthwise down the middle and spread the halves apart to access the heart. After the heart is repaired, surgeons use wires to hold the breastbone and ribs in place as they heal.

"Removing a blood clot through open-heart surgery results in longer hospitalization, recovery and rehabilitation times compared to the minimally invasive approach provided by this new device," said Victor Pretorius, MBchB, cardiothoracic surgeon at UC San Diego Health System.

Read more here

(via chroniclesofachemist)

Jul 13, 2014 / 122,817 notes

(via laugh-addict)

attackonstudying:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

I would like to thank my parents for my education!
Jul 13, 2014 / 70,006 notes

attackonstudying:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

I would like to thank my parents for my education!

Jul 12, 2014 / 293 notes
Jul 12, 2014 / 449,716 notes
  • spanish and italian: So THESE words are feminine and THESE words are masculine, and you ALWAYS put an adjective AFTER the noun.
  • french: haha i dont fuckin know man just do whatever
  • german: LET'S ADD A NEUTRAL NOUN HAHA
  • english: *shooting up in the bathroom*
  • gaelic: the pronounciation changes depending on the gender and what letter the word starts and ends with and hahah i dont even know good fucking luck
  • polish: here have all of these consonants have fun
  • japanese: subject article noun article verb. too bad there's three fucking alphabets lmao hope your first language isn't western
  • welsh: sneeze, and chances are you've got it right. idfk
  • chinese: here's a picture. draw it. it means something. it can be pronounced four different ways. these twenty other pictures are pronounced the same but have very different meanings. godspeed.
  • arabic: so here's this one word. it actually translates to three words. also pronouns don't really exist. the gender is all in the verb. have fun!
  • latin: here memorize 500 charts and then you still dont know what the fuck is happening
  • sign language: If you move this sign by a tenth of an inch, you'll be signing "penis"
  • russian: idk man its pronounced like its spelt but good fucking luck spelling it
  • Greek: so basically we're going to add 15 syllables to every word you know and assign it one of 3 genders at random. Also good luck figuring out where to put the accents you piece of shit
Jul 12, 2014 / 599,457 notes

Today I went to Subway.

There were these 12 year old boys hanging around. As I got my food and left they were all checking me out like little prepubescent lemurs and one of them said “Can I get your number?” And I turned around and said “Why, you need a babysitter?”

image

(via laugh-addict)

Jul 12, 2014 / 35,871 notes

catsbeaversandducks:

Cats are very serious about video games.
"Pew! Pew! Pew!"

Via Kotaku.com

(via laugh-addict)